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December 14, 2013 / Jett

Contrast Impressions


One of the first products to come out as part of the PlayStation 4’s big indie push is Contrast. Created by Compulsion Games, this is a puzzle platformer that forces you to think of shadows in a different light (no pun intended). While it definitely looks cool and has an interesting gameplay hook on paper, some glaring production issues put me off fairly quickly.
Set in a fantastical noire world, you control a woman named Dawn with the ability to merge into walls as a shadow. From there, she can use other shadows as platforms, which gives her more ways to travel around. You use this power to help out Didi, a young girl whose parents are going through some tough times.

The game’s art style gives the game a striking look. However, its inconsistent framerate constantly undermines its overall presentation. Couple that with the quick and sometimes jerky speed your character moves at, I actually felt a bit queasy while watching the game in action.

The thing that drove me nuts throughout my limited time with the game was how imprecise Dawn’s jumps were. If I wasn’t coming up short or sailing way past the platform I meant to land on, I’d land towards the edge and immediately slide off. For a game with such a heavy emphasis on platforming, it sure proved difficult to accurately land on anything.

While the PlayStation 4’s game lineup is thin, I don’t feel compelled to play any more Contrast. It’s strong points didn’t do much to win me over and its flaw immediately got under my skin. Grab it while it’s still free on PlayStation Plus, as you might get more out of it than I did. However, once it becomes a pay-to-play title, this one is hard to recommend.


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One Comment

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  1. jjmahoney007 / Dec 14 2013 8:11 AM

    That’s pretty much exactly how I feel about it. I stopped right after you were supposed to leave the lounge. It’s an interesting concept, but I don’t feel obligated to keep playing.

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